Wednesday Forums Archive

Page 2 of 13 (127 entries)

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014
Bringing “Ecofeminism” and Post Collonialism to Address Ritual and Dancing and the Dancing as Ritual
Bringing “Ecofeminism” and Post Collonialism to Address Ritual and Dancing and the Dancing as Ritual
It is interesting to address ritual and dancing in the ways they are complicatedly connected to broader contexts. For instance, by considering political effects of the "international" and globalization to local aesthetics. Accordingly, meanings of ritual and dancing can be explored by questioning...
Tuesday, April 1st, 2014
Muslim in America and Its Complexity
Muslim in America and Its Complexity
Despite the fact that Muslim is a religious minority in America (less than1% of the total population), there are estimated to be 6-7 million Muslims living in America. Moreover, there are over 2,100 mosques in the USA. Interestingly, the number is growing significantly through immigration,...
Friday, March 14th, 2014
Drug and Collonialism in Java: Opium-Related Problems in the Dutch East Indies
Drug and Collonialism in Java: Opium-Related Problems in the Dutch East Indies
Since the mid-nineteenth century, one of the most disputable issues in colonial Indonesia was the Dutch government policy on opium. The dispute is related to ethical reasons denouncing the colonial state exploitation by taking profits from selling various drugs to the population. The drugs include...
Friday, March 7th, 2014
Rethinking Religion and Diversity: The Case of Indonesia and Canada
Rethinking Religion and Diversity: The Case of Indonesia and Canada
The largest Muslim population in the world is in Indonesia, but it also a home for many other religious populations. The Indonesian government recognizes six official religions but there are many religious groups in Indonesia other than the official religions. Similarly, Canada’s population...
Friday, March 7th, 2014
Addressing Sainthood in Balinese Muslim Traditions
Addressing Sainthood in Balinese Muslim Traditions
The most dominant religious identification of Bali is Hinduism. Therefore, Islam in Bali got less attention (Geertz 1963; 1980; 1983; Howe 2005). However, the presence of Muslims in Bali can be historically traced to the establishment of the Hindu kingdom of Ge`lge`l in 1380. In fact, Muslims...
Friday, March 7th, 2014
Jewish Existence in Nusantara Revisited: A Historical Analysis on Identity
Jewish Existence in Nusantara Revisited: A Historical Analysis on Identity
Jewish history and reality in Nusantara are indefinite for most of Indonesian. Therefore, it is important to understand the dynamics of Jewish by analysing manifest and hidden facts throghout Nusantara history and contemporary discourse. Accordingly, there is considerable growing of...
Friday, December 6th, 2013
Patriarchy Reinterpreted: The Case of Naga Traditional Society
Patriarchy Reinterpreted: The Case of Naga Traditional Society
As is common in the world, Naga society is characteristically patriarchal. For this reason, certain feminist views consider it as a society where men dominate and discriminate women. However, what happened in Naga society is equal sharing responsibilities between men and women, especially in...
Friday, December 6th, 2013
The Defeat of Pluralism: The Case of Lia Aminuddin
The Defeat of Pluralism: The Case of Lia Aminuddin
The ‘false prophets’ and heretic movements are long-standing phenomena in this country. This implies that Indonesia is not only fertile for growing of various flora and fauna, but also for the birth of various religious groups. Furthermore, most of Indonesian...
Thursday, November 14th, 2013
Significance of Implicit Theories and Competition in Intergroup Bias
Significance of Implicit Theories and Competition in Intergroup Bias
It has by now become agreement among psychologists that people can make their own theories. According to Dweck’s arguments about implicit theories (1999), there are entity and incremental theories among people. In this regards, entity theory argues that common people are beliefs on his/her...
Friday, November 8th, 2013
The Javanese Traditional System of Belief and the Concept of Power
The Javanese Traditional System of Belief and the Concept of Power
It has by now become obvious to many scholars that there is significance of the Javanese traditional system of belief coming before the arrival of the Abrahamic religions. Interestingly, Indian world-view and concept of power have highly shapes the traditional system of belief. For instance, it is...